A Snake Yarn ...

Snake Bandage, Snake Bite, Snakes -

A Snake Yarn ...

So this city-slicker (me) moved to this wonderful property deep in the rainforests of North Queensland. Sound asleep, 4am, my little dog gave that bark which meant "I'm not joking Mum this is serious". 

Green tree snake of north queenslandHopping out of bed, I turned the light on only to see a huge snake stretched across my headboard.  Deciding that discretion was the better part of valour, and while I was pretty sure it wasn't venomous, I really didn't know my snakes yet.  So downstairs for a tea and a look at the best book I own - Wildlife of Tropical Queensland.  Phew! It was just a green tree snake according to the book.  Back upstairs, I caught it just slithering out the window, leaving the most gynormous and beautiful skin draped over the headboard.

So Green Tree Snake Facts:

The common tree snake, Dendrelaphis punctulatus, (also called green tree snake and Australian tree snake) is a slender, large-eyed, non-venomous, diurnal snake of many parts of Australia, especially in the northern and eastern coastal areas.

This common snake is harmless, readily recognised as it is an agile snake with a very slender body and tail. The body colour varies from green to olive-green to black, sometimes even blue, frequently pale yellow on the throat and belly but other pale colours have been noted, blue flecks are present on the flank. Eyes are larger than in most snakes. Found in a variety of habitats ranging from rainforest to woodland to urban areas where it preys on fish, frogs and other small animals.

It has a primitive venom apparatus and a mildly toxic venom that is not regarded as dangerous to human beings. Its tiny grooved venom-conducting fangs are positioned to the back of the upper jaw, meaning that it must partially swallow its prey in order to work the fang's toxin.


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